Overcrowding at the Renwick

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As you enter the Renwick Gallery there is a sign at the top of the building above where the entrance is that reads “Dedicated to Art”. Since before the Renwick had even reopened that is one of my favorite features of it. I was not incredibly excited to be going to the Renwick for this field trip, since I have gone before. I wasn’t excited due to the long lines and indirectly touristy feel of it all. Taking photographs of the artwork there always makes me feel like another one of the tourists, and not someone who actually wants to appreciate the art. I also feel like everyone else is taking pictures from the same angles, of the same artwork. I decided to make a goal in this visit to take a picture from a perspective I have not seen as much. It was incredibly difficult, and I really only got one photograph I think is worth sharing. In the article “The Renwick is suddenly Instagram famous. But what about the art?” there is one sentence that I really resonated with that states “At the ­Louvre in Paris, you can barely see the Mona Lisa through the forest of arms holding up cellphones in front of it.”. I have been to the Louvre a handful of times, and I have only seen the Mona Lisa once. This is mainly because of exactly what Judkis says in that sentence: It is so crowded with people photographing it that I literally crouched down and weaved between people’s legs to get up to the front where I could view the da Vinci masterpiece.  I struggle with a similar issue at the Renwick, no matter where I tried to aim my photographs, or tried to view the art, there was always another person in the shot or somehow blocking my view of the artwork. Although the installations at the Renwick are amazing and I have loved to be able to observe and photograph them, it is hard for me to be encouraged to return to the Renwick when I know that it will be overcrowded with both people observing artwork and those photographing it, and that my experience there will not be one that allows me to sit in front of a piece and really analyze it like I could if it were empty or even just quieter.

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